Proto-Web in 1934

An article in NY Times about a Belgian inventor Paul Otlet who in 1930s created a proto-Web that "relied on a patchwork of analog technologies like index cards and telegraph machines":

"In 1934, Otlet sketched out plans for a global network of computers (or "electric telescopes," as he called them) that would allow people to search and browse through millions of interlinked documents, images, audio and video files. He described how people would use the devices to send messages to one another, share files and even congregate in online social networks. He called the whole thing a "rĂ©seau," which might be translated as "network" — or arguably, "web.""


"He hired more staff, and established a fee-based research service that allowed anyone in the world to submit a query via mail or telegraph — a kind of analog search engine. Inquiries poured in from all over the world, more than 1,500 a year, on topics as diverse as boomerangs and Bulgarian finance."

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